R500m to upgrade informal settlements in Gauteng

Posted On Thursday, 20 January 2005 02:00 Published by
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Provincial government has set aside over R500 million for the next financial year to upgrade and formalise informal settlements in the province.

By Lazarus Mabasa, tel: (012) 314-2175

The Gauteng provincial government has set aside over R500 million for the next financial year to upgrade and formalise informal settlements in the province.
 
Housing MEC Nomvula Mokonyane told the media in Eldorado Park, south of Johannesburg today, that authorities were concentrating on Ekurhuleni and Johannesburg as they were leading areas with many informal settlements.
 
This after it became apparent that many people countrywide flocked to the two mega-metros in search for jobs, which culminated in the mushrooming of squatter camps.
 
The places to be concentrated on are Lawley, Wailersfarm where 3 200 houses will be built, including at Thulamtwana.
 
At least 3 348 will be built at Kliptown, in Soweto.
 
However, Thembhelihle residents would soon be relocated to Vlakfontein where authorities will build 3 134 houses.
 
“Our approach is to make sure that there is housing security and comfort in areas that are hard hit by informal settlements.
 
“We don’t actually want to throw people out to streets, we want to make sure that all people are secured and our approach will be to implement the national housing plan,” said Ms Mokonyane.
 
She added the provincial government had already entered into service level agreements with the City of Johannesburg to work on developing and implementing informal settlements.
 
In his state of nation directive last year, President Thabo Mbeki committed his administration to   converting all squatters’ camps into decent areas by 2014.
 
The move by Gauteng authorities is in concert with a similar step in Western Cape, where the provincial administration has announced plans to eradicate informal settlement along the busy N2 in Cape Town.
 
However, the Gauteng government has registered 70 percent of people living in informal settlements for proper houses that would have with basic services such as running water, electricity and sewage systems.
 
The housing department would also look on the 1996 waiting list within Soweto to make sure that all people in the list are provided with houses.
 
“We will work together with the municipalities to enforce the law to deal with land invasion because they are much closer to the communities,” she said - BuaNews   


Publisher: BuaNews
Source: BuaNews

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